FlashFlood

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Archive for the ‘Contests’ Category

Friday Round-Up

Posted by Flood on June 27, 2006

Busy with life, busy perusing entries in the Midnight Road Contest, busy with interviews. Thanks again to Scott, who gave us more than a good interview, but a motto with which to achieve my writing goals.

On Monday, we visit with Forrest Landry of For the Trees. He has some interesting points to make about Print-On-Demand publishing and why he uses it. I am hoping for some lively discussion based on his thoughts. I’ve been having a lot of fun interviewing “gonna-be’s,” as Bernita has referred to them. I want a turn too, so I am collecting your questions for me here. If I get enough interest, I’ll be able to have a freebie entry someday when I can’t think of anything to write.

If you have been a fan of the wildly popular Wandering Scribe, (whose book is due out in early 2007,) you may be interested in this article, about other homeless bloggers. (Scroll down)

This series of photos on Flickr, depicting a library giving up and lying down cracked me up.

Wetpaint helps you create “free click-and-type websites you can share with like-minded people.”

That’s why we created Wetpaint. Yes, blogs make online publishing easy — but blogs are monologues. And forums are great for question and answers, but they’re too hard to search. And wikis allow the reader to become the writer, editor and fact-checker, but they’re just too darn hard to use for the average person. Wetpaint is different. With Wetpaint, anyone with a passion can create an entirely new website and invite others to help them build it. And it’s easy — adding to a Wetpaint site is as simple as click and type. No, Wetpaint won’t cure cancer. But it will most certainly make it easier for anyone to share ideas, trade stories, and find people who are passionate about the same things you are. So try it, have fun, and let us know what you think.

If you have a passion for a certain subject, this might be a great tool for you.

Fringes continues her reviews of the latest SmokeLong Quarterly. If you are considering starting your own series of related posts, Lorelle has some technical tips for you.

If you haven’t yet, check out the new lit ezine Picolata Review. Jamie Ford and Jeff Neale, among others, have fantastic stories in the inaugural issue.

Horror writers, don’t forget about the 3rd Tastes of Darkness Carnival. Submissions due June 28. 1 and 2 are available to read now. Thanks to Melly for the reminder.

That’s it! Have a great weekend.

Posted in Blogging, Contests, Flash Fiction, Interviews, Writing | Leave a Comment »

Stories and Friends

Posted by Flood on June 23, 2006

I'll remind you again on Friday's Round-Up, but Jason Evans (The Clarity of Night) is hosting another contest, with great prizes and a new theme. It begins on Wednesday, so get your thinking caps on and your pencils ready because it's going to be fun.

I just started this blog a few days before Jason's last contest and that was where I came to know some of you who read FlashFlood each day. That's why I feel compelled to tell all of you that whether you enter a story or not, you should pay attention to those who do. Someone will write something that resonates with you. Someone's work will speak to you. Discussions in the comments of each entry will peak your interest in someone else. In one event, you could come out with at least one or two loyal new readers, and someone new to visit as you make your blogging rounds each day. When you look at it that way, everyone wins.

If this is your first contest, like Two Lights was mine, I wish you the best of luck. I took great pride out of finding the courage to submit something. It was the stepping stone I needed to get out there and dare to suck.

As I approach my two month anniversary of blogging, I can see how the blog is changing. My original intentions grew into something else. I like where it's going. I feel like part of the community. I enjoy visiting you in your space each day and I am pleased to know you like coming to mine. Thank you. A note to new readers: if I have neglected to put you on my blogroll, please let me know. I've tried to keep up to date but I feel like I am missing someone.

Posted in Contests, Writing | 1 Comment »

Did you write like a winner today?

Posted by Flood on May 7, 2006

I am still wavering on condensing the blog or not. I like the idea of what I got going here, but I suspect it's difficult to navigate. I've seen other blogs that simply catergorize, but I don't think that's a feature with Blogger?

Anyway, in review, I found a fantastic blog that compiles flash and short fiction contests. It's set up in a great way, with a calendar view of what contest is due when. I know Ms Snark says contests ultimately mean nothing as far as getting published, but I think it's a great way to practice meeting deadlines. It can also provide motivation, making contact with like-minded people and putting your work out there to be seen.

It's also good to thicken your skin as far as rejection goes. Woohoo!

I just like setting a goal (i.e., I will write this and have it done and sent in by this date) and being proud of the fact that it was simply completed.

In that vein, I am trying for this contest at Desdemona.com. I have a week and it looks like a fun thing to attempt. I love hard-boiled pulp fiction, but I am not sure I can write it. New goal! If I finish it, and send it in on time, I'll feel like I won. Wish me luck.

[post script: It's stupid that the blogger spell check recognizes neither "blog" or "Snark"]

Posted in Blogging, Contests | Leave a Comment »

The Two Lights Contest

Posted by Flood on April 24, 2006

My first entry to Clarity of Night's contest, was too long at 446 words:

The Widower's Light

We did all we can do. I am sorry to tell you your wife has died.

He feels like a fool in the alcove under the stairs of the funeral parlour.

He is crouched awkwardly and cannot breathe well enough for an old man with old lungs.

She had a good life. She was happy.

He hears the director bid good evening to her staff. He listens as she makes her way through the building, turning off lights and closing doors. As he prays that she does not also lock each door, the already dim lights of the corridor in which he made his hideout are turn off altogether. The only source of light now are twin lamps, set on a table opposite his alcove.

Two lights in the darkness.

I cannot leave Frances in here alone.

He hears steps falling into the corridor and toward him. He can only assume that the director will now leave through the back door at the end. Adjusting himself as softly as he can, he tries to inhale deeply to hold his breath as she walks past. His lungs betray him, yet again. He tries furiously to catch his breath and finds himself caught instead.

'Hello? Who's there?' The startled director turns his way, blocking what little light is shed by the two lamps. He waves his hand in dismissal and tries to speak that it is all right, just an old man, no harm done really. Nothing comprehensible escapes his coughing fit.

Frances has never been alone at night since we were married.

"Are you all right? Mr. Dobson! What are you doing here? Are you all right?" Mr. Dobson nods as he lurches into the corridor. Stumbling, he knocks over one of the lamps. It crashes to the floor and flickers out.

She would have lived if I didn't panic.

Struggling to gain balance he reaches out for the funeral director's shoulder. She backs away, not understanding the gesture. Mr Dobson continues to fight for large gulps of air. Panicked, he tries for the table, only to knock over the second light. As it drops to his feet, he flails to avoid it. The funeral director thinks, I should call 9-1-1. She tries to pass him to get back to her office, he trips over her and collapses onto the light.

Darkness. Sudden stillness envelopes the corridor once again. The funeral director calls his name.

'Mr. Dobson?'

You have to find a way to live without her now, Dad.

The funeral director falls to her knees to blindly feel for vital signs. Finding none, she goes back to her office to use the phone.

Editing it down to 250 words proved difficult:

The Widower's Light

I am sorry to tell you your wife has died.

In a funeral home, under some stairs, Dobson is crouched in an alcove.

She had a good life.

The funeral director is closing up. He listens as she makes her way through the building, turning off lights and closing doors. The ceiling lights of the corridor in which he hides go out. The only source of light are twin lamps, set on a table opposite his alcove.

I cannot leave Frances alone in here.

Footsteps approach. He tries to hold his breath as she walks past. His lungs betray him. He tries to catch his breath but he is caught instead.

'Hello? Who's there?' The startled director turns his way, blocking light shed by the lamps. He waves his hand dismissively. Only an old man…but nothing escapes his coughing fit.

Frances has never been alone at night since we were married.

‘Mr. Dobson! Are you-?’ Dobson lurches into the corridor. Stumbling, he knocks over one lamp. It flickers out, in shards.

She would have lived if I didn't panic.

Unstable, he reaches for the director. She backs away, confused. Dobson, still fighting for air, is panicked. Reaching for the table, the second light falls. The director tries to pass him to get to a phone. They collide; he collapses.

Darkness.

'Mr. Dobson?'

Find a way to live without her now, Dad.

The director blindly feels for vital signs. Finding none, she goes back to her office to use the phone.

I like the first much better than the second, but in either case I find this line: "Find a way to live without her now, Dad." to be trite and doesn't quite convey what I was going for.

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